Category Archives: New Releases

Free Excerpt of Jane Jackson’s The Master’s Wife!

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We bring you an exclusive lunchtime treat – a cheeky snippet of Jane Jackson’s The Master’s Wife, the second book in The Captain Honours Series! 

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‘When you’ve finished writing, leave the pen and ink out, will you? I need to update the log.’

She glanced round and saw him strip off his shirt, revealing a broad back and muscular shoulders. Longing pierced and a flush burned her cheeks. He was her husband, the only man she had ever kissed, touched, held, loved.  He was her husband and he had lain naked with Louise Downing; made love with Louise Downing… She choked down a painful stiffness in her throat and carefully wiped the pen nib on a cotton square before laying it on the grooved wooden tray.

Water splashed, she smelled the fragrance of the soap she had used, heard the soft rasp of the towel as he rubbed himself dry, then the rustle of clothing as he dressed again.   He emptied and replaced the basin then carried the bucket and ewer to the door.

‘Goodnight.’ Caseley limped into the sleeping cabin, pulling off her shawl and dropping it over the foot of the berth. She reached for the curtain but didn’t touch it. With it drawn across, the small space that had once been a cosy private haven now felt lonely and claustrophobic. She lay down and pulled the blankets over her. Had she no pride? What kind of fool longed for a man who preferred someone else? A tear soaked into the pillow.

When Jago returned to the cabin he sat down and opened the log. Elbows propped on the table he raked both hands through his hair. Tension made his scalp ache.

He was ashamed of his pleasure at seeing Caseley out of the black that constantly reminded him of his failure. Recognizing her uncertainty about wearing a summery dress, he had hoped to reassure her. She was still hurting, her loss still a raw wound. She hadn’t uttered a word of complaint. That made it worse. He didn’t know what to do and hated his helplessness.

After meeting the reporter in the Custom House, he and Pawlyn had walked along the quay to Cygnet. Making conversation, Pawlyn had asked if he had family. He’d said no, and left it at that. Explanations would invite commiserations that were pointless and painful. They reminded him too vividly of Caseley’s drawn, grief-ravaged face when he arrived home too late.

How could he ever make it up to her? Did she even want him to? That her rage seemed to have dissolved only increased his guilt. Their conversations were pleasant and their unspoken understanding of each other’s thinking on all other matters was still intact. If only she would meet his gaze, she would surely see everything he could not find words for: how much he missed her, needed her.

Several times, about to blurt it out, he had bitten his tongue to stop himself. Such a confession would make it about him and that was self-indulgence while she was coming to terms with such devastating loss. He would live with the permanent ache at the base of his skull and a gut tied in knots. He would wait for as long as it took. He had adored his sons. But Caseley was the love of his life. So he would wait until she was ready, until she turned to him.

***

The Master’s Wife is available to purchase on amazon.

For news on Jane Jackson make sure you head on over to her Facebook page or follow Jane on Twitter 

Guest Blog Post by Cheryl Rees-Price: Creating the protagonist – How Winter Meadows gained the lead role

The inspiration for The Silent Quarry came from walking the dog up a footpath that runs alongside a disused quarry. It can be quiet, shadowy and eerie along this route and more often than not you don’t pass a living soul.  Like most writers I have a vivid imagination and as I walked I would start at every snap of a twig, glancing around to see if anyone was lurking behind a tree. I should have been comforted by the fact that Blue, an enormous Siberian husky was close at heel but he was as much use as a mouse and more likely to run away faster than me from any threat.  As I walked further along the path my mind turned to the murder that occurred in this spot in the 70’s and I wondered what would happen if the dog was to arrive home without me. Would my family know where I was? Would they send out a search party? From this spark of an idea I developed the plot to The Silent Quarry.

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Blue the husky who has his own role in the book.

Ideas for the book came faster than I could write but as I outlined the chapters and built my cast I struggled to find my protagonist.  I wanted a detective that the reader could connect with, full of personality and complete with fears and faults.

I set about naming and creating the main character and built in a background story adding a career history, family and birthday until the profile was complete. Slowly DI Lester came to life, I didn’t have an instant connection to him but thought I would give him a trail run, a bit like a probation period in a new job.  As the story grew I realised that no detective is complete without a side kick. The book was put on hold while I set about creating Lester’s partner.

I wanted a character to contrast with DI Lester and bring a different perspective to the story. To achieve this I started with the character’s background story. I chose an unconventional upbringing, home educated and raised in a commune with a hippy mother and absent father. Next I needed to find the perfect name to sum up the character. After many hours of pondering, Winter Meadows was born, mild mannered, fair and compassionate with a hint of intrigue he was the complete opposite to DI Lester and I felt an instant connection. But rather than complimenting Lester he posed a new problem. Winter Meadows fascinated me and was so much more interesting than DI Lester.

I instantly promoted Winter to lead character. Very quickly he took over the role and came to life, often dictating the direction of the story. It really is true when writers say that a character can take on a life of their own and they don’t always do what you want.

As for DI Lester he still makes an appearance in the book along with Blue the dog.

In 1987 a quiet Welsh village was devastated by a brutal attack on two schoolgirls, Bethan Hopkins and Gwen Collier. Only Gwen survived, with horrific injuries and no memory of the attack. The killer was never caught. Now, nearly thirty years later, Gwen has gone missing and DI Winter Meadows is assigned to the case. Charismatic and intuitive, he has an uncanny gift for finding the truth. But in this small and close-knit community, the past is never far away, and those who have secrets will go to any lengths to keep them. Tensions run high as old feelings and accusations are stirred. And DI Meadows has to battle his own demons as he uncovers a truth he wished had stayed in the past …

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Caroline Dunford: A Death for a Cause

 

A Death for a Causesuff

I always vote. Whether it’s a local, general or European election, I’ll be there making my X on the paper. When friends have commented on this commitment to voting – a surprising amount of people don’t bother  – I used to jokingly reply that if I didn’t vote I was sure the ghost of Emmeline Pankhurst would haunt me. However, it was only  when I was researching for the latest Euphemia mystery, A Death for a Cause, that I came to appreciate how very much suffragettes did to liberate British women.

“I used to jokingly reply that if I didn’t vote I was sure the ghost of Emmeline Pankhurst would haunt me.”

On the 6th February 1918 women over the age of 30 got the right to vote. Let’s think about that. It’s less than one hundred years since women have been able to exercise the democratic right to vote. Or put another way, my grandmother wasn’t allowed to vote. As a woman she was not deemed fit. One glance at the news will tell you that there are still plenty of places left the world over where women do not have equal rights to men. In Britain we’re lucky and it is down to the efforts of the bands of women from all classes, who spoke up, marched and protested, that we have the rights we do. They endured imprisonment, permanent health damage from force feeding and even attacks (from both men and women) who did not agree with their cause.

Euphemia is inspired by my Great Grandmother, who left a life of privilege and wealth, after arguing with her father, to go into service. She never returned to her home, but instead married a tobacconist and had thirteen children, all of whom survived infancy. Like her, Euphemia is a strong woman struggling to make a place for herself in a world where the only future for women of her class was either to marry or cast herself on the mercy of relatives.

But in A Death for a Cause, Euphemia, who considers herself liberally minded and an armchair suffragette, is brought up against the reality of the brutality inflicted upon women asking for no more than the some of the rights men automatically gain at birth. She is introduced to a world where women are prepared to smash windows, sabotage telephone exchanges and even set fire bombs in the name of female emancipation. To be fair although the suffragettes did adopt the motto of ‘deeds not words’ there was some division within the ranks of how far it was right to go for the cause.

But for a long time their efforts were in vain. Prime Minister Asquith appeared to simply not take them seriously no matter what they did. He was known as a lover of women (in the literal sense), but the thought they might have equal intelligence to men was preposterous to him.

Women were constantly under-rated. Even when women began to be admitted to the universities, obviously to all female colleges, there were violent reactions from male students. To begin with women might study the same subjects, sit and pass examinations, but they not awarded degrees. Just as women who studied medicine where not, at first, allowed to practise.

It’s difficult for British women today to imagine this, but it’s true. It took an army of strong women to make a difference. We need to take the time to remember them – and always vote!

A Death for a cause

 

 

 

If you’ve been excited about the film Suffragette then you’ll love this new release A Death for a Cause which shares similar themes! Pre-order today or buy tomorrow! Not long to wait! 

 

 

Bertie and the Kinky Politician – Five Star Amazon Preview

Bertie and the Kinky Politician

” This book has everything. Action. Skulduggery. Slightly weird sex. Cruelly accurate observations on the competence of Gloucester Council’s planning department. Political shenanigans. A love story. You name it – it’s all here!

I won’t give away the plot – it’s complicated but not unnecessarily so. Just put your feet up and enjoy the literary world’s latest and most unusual hero.”

Click here for more information

A Bachelor Establishment – perfect for Georgette Heyer fans #RegencyRomance


High adventure and dark mystery combine in a sparkling historical romance

Jodi Taylor writing as Isabella Barclay

Elinor Bascombe, widowed and tied to an impoverished estate, has learned to ask little of life. With no hope of leaving, the years have passed her by.

Lord Ryde, exiled abroad after a scandal, has returned to strip his estate and make a new start in America.

A chance encounter changes their plans, plunging Elinor and Lord Ryde into adventure and not a little peril until, finally, they are forced to confront the mystery of what happened on That Night, all those years ago.

Are they both so entangled in the riddles of the past that they are about to miss this one last opportunity for future happiness?



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Shiver: Accent’s Spooky Shorts for Hallowe’en

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Accent Press are proud to announce Shiver, a selection of spooky, scintillating, and scary stories from some of Accent Press’s best-loved authors. Featuring gruesome crime from Bill Kitson and Andrea Frazer, a frighteningly modern fairy tale from Helena Fairfax, ghostly goings-on from Christina Jones, David Rogers, Jane Risdon, Marie Laval, and Tricia Maw, a twisted take on a national pastime from Cara Cooper, and the supernatural side of reality TV from Caroline Dunford.So this Hallowe’en, if you’re hankering for a haunting, could murder a mystery, or are prepared to be scared – let Accent make you shiver.

 

 

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Christina Jones Outselling J. K. Rowling!

Outselling JK

Accent Press’s new version of Christina Jones’ Tickled Pink is spending its 15th day in the top 100 of the Amazon.co.uk Kindle store, outselling J.K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike crime series (written under the Robert Galbraith pen name), and is at #9 in the chart already. We at Accent are over the moon about Christina’s sales; she’s a highly talented author and a wonderful person to work with. We truly believe that Tickled Pink is the perfect summer read!

Accent Press are now releasing new versions of Christina’s back list, with the bestselling Walking on Air just out and doing well. Stay tuned for new releases of Going the Distance, Jumping to Conclusions, Running the Risk, Stealing the Show, Summer of Love, Forever Autumn, and Nothing to Lose!

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Love Castaway by Cara Cooper

Dr Nancy Taylor, is contented with her lone conservationist role on a desert island. When Gareth Marrs lands his plane she wants him out of there. She craves isolation from the real world where she made a mistake so awful she cannot bear to return.

Owner of a luxury cruise line, Gareth plans to profit from her precious hideaway. He is less than honest with Nancy about his reasons for being there. When the island is attacked by Somalian pirates, Gareth not only protects Nancy but begins to understand why she has shut herself away. He is deeply attracted to the beautiful enigmatic scientist, so different from the shallow conquests in his city home. When he awakens the emotions she has hidden for so long, Gareth offers a chance of happiness. But Nancy discovers his real reason for invading her hidden paradise, incensed, she orders him out of her life forever. Gareth isn’t a man so easily brushed off. Besides he knows the only future he can contemplate lies with her if only he can get her to face up to her demons.



 

Seventh Daughter

Seventh Daughter by Gill Sanderson

Dr Delyth Price was stunned by her reaction to her new boss, the intriguing Dr James Owen. He was everything she’d ever wanted in a man. But Delyth was the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter and had a gift that not everyone understood. James, at least, seemed prepared to listen, if not to believe … and he asked her out, even if he was clearly holding something back.

Then she discovered his light-hearted side, and fell even more deeply in love.